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Module 3 Online – includes exploring the EASI.

We are delighted to announce that Module 3 (and Module 6) have now gone online in a live interactive format. Get your internationally approved certification in Ayres’ SI.

For therapists learning Ayres’ SI during and just post-COVID-19 while travel remains tricky, we are offering this liver interactive face to face learning virtually, working with world experts in Ayres’ SI ensuring we can continue to meet ICEASI standards for sensory integration education while socially distancing.

Module 3 deepens therapist learning about Ayres SI and the sensory systems, learning about these in detail across a range of different assessment tools – including ideas about how to adapt the SIPT and Ayres’ Clin Obs for adult clinical populations. 

We will explore both the SIPT and EASI – thinking about each test within these test batteries, considering how individual tests are similar and different, how they relate to each other and what they can tell us about how these tests relates to sensory challenges  impacting on participation in everyday life. We explore ways to assess clients who cannot complete standardised assessment, including applying this new learning to unstructured clinical observations and ways to capture this data. 

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Learn more about new tools in development including changes to the SPM, and the FLIQ (Family Life Impact Questionnaire) currently being researched as part of te EASI Project. We consider a wide range of tools, their use clinically including the Adult Adolescent Sensory History

Kath Smith and the team at ASI Wise will guide you through this learning over 4 days, where you will work with others online, complete practical activities via Zoom and at home, so that you are supported to consider how to provide comprehensive assessment, even while socially distanced.

We will also introduce you to ASI assessment via telehealth in our post-module weekly live tutor groups on gotomeeting.

To book please visit www.sensoryproject.org/shop

 

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Research Updates: DCD and Sensory Integration

So often people ask about DCD and sensory integration, and often the reply given is a quote from Bundy Lane

A recent study concluded that

“Our findings indicate that sensory processing abnormalities may contribute to the pathophysiology of DCD, suggesting the importance of assessing sensory processing functions in children with DCD.”

MIkami et al, 2020

This useful article from Pathways is often also referred to; https://pathways.org/developmental-coordination-disorder-and-sensory-processing-issues-in-children/

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Connection and community matters

Summer is here, and we have hope that we are now leaving behind the struggles of Spring 2020 and C-19. The world has been reminded about the importance of social relationships – we have all realised how much we value family, friends and having strong support and connections. Stay with us or join us and be a part of our Sensory at Home communities as we enter a new phase after being ‘sensory stuck at home’.

Sensory at Home

Sensory at Home Teens

Sensory at Home Grown-Ups

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The importance of a comprehensive assessment

Thank you to the families who gave consent and our secret blogger OT for this contribution.

“A little while ago, two mums approached me and both asked about assessments for their children. Both were young adults, academically highly able and struggling with their self-organisation and motor skills.

Both young people consented to an assessment and completed, through self-report, the Adult/ Adolescent Sensory History (AASH) questionnaire. They were also assessed with the Sensory Integration and Praxis Test (SIPT). The SIPT is a standardised assessment with normative data for ages 4 through 8 years, 11 months. On this particular assessment tool, sensory integration and processing skills scores plateau at around this age, though the test is still informative for people beyond this age, who should have achieved.

The young lady assessed has a diagnosis of social anxiety and has low confidence, while the young man is quite a confident character. She has a history of bumps, trips and spills, and will tell anecdotes of these with great humour; while he prefers to focus on what he does well in conversation.

I love the AASH, the reports it gives highlight each sensory system, differentiate between discrimination and modulation difficulties and addresses motor planning, sequencing and social/ emotional aspects of sensory integration and processing needs.

It uses clear, non-patronising language and activities appropriate to adults and adolescents. It shows up really clearly a person’s (or their caregiver’s as necessary) perception of their sensory integration and processing needs and how these affect their day to day life. In this instance, the young lady highlighted many sensory processing needs.

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The young man reported almost no difficulties, his only score in the primary sensory systems section was mild proprioceptive difficulties. When questioned as to the accuracy of his answers, he tended to reply “well, nobody likes that, do they?”

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Having scored the AASH checklists, I completed a SIPT with each person. The SIPT is a battery of 17 tests which assess a person’s sensory integration and processing including perceptual-motor skills through tasks with standardised administration and normative data against which to compare an individuals test results. Guess which person showed more significant difficulties in the direct assessment? 

On the SIPT assessment scores between -1 and +1 standard deviation are considered typical, above +1 are strengths and scores below -1 are of clinical significance and require support and will benefit from direct intervention.

The exception to this being Post Rotatory Nystagmus in which a low (below -1) or high score (above +1) indicates significant difficulty inhibiting response to vestibular information and often relates to a low Standing and Walking Balance score.

Here are the young lady’s SIPT results:

 

 

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Definite movement, balance and body awareness difficulties but also some areas of significant strength, particularly around her visual skills and imitation, which she uses to compensate for her body awareness difficulties.

Here’s the young man’s chart:

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Strong visual skills, compensating for significant challenges in the other areas.

This experience taught me so much. From the AASH scores, I was expecting the young lady to have much more problems in the SIPT than the young man, their conversation about their lifestyles confirmed this expectation. Still, then the assessment showed so clearly how much of that was related to confidence.

An evaluation based solely on checklists is not enough. It tells you what a person perceives to be their difficulties, guides the direction of evaluation and adds experiential evidence to the overall assessment.

A good questionnaire is evidence-based and norm-referenced, but it always needs to be triangulated with direct observation and where possible structured and standardised assessment. These tools can tell you so much about the respondent’s confidence and resilience and what they find easy or difficult in day to day life. But I have learned it is a mistake to rely upon one alone when assessing somebody’s sensory integration and processing skills and needs”.

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ICEASI Education Standards Approved.

We are answering more and more questions online, via text and What’s App – all asking the same questions about our Certification in Ayres’ SI, and why our experienced Directors and Lecturers have chosen to be affiliated with the CL-ASI Programme.

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We suggest that this recently published document developed after much consultation and with consensus from many organisations teaching ASI around the globe, is helpful (see below). Read more here about ICEASI, it’s history and development of these standards, which were published in an AOTA publication here. 

ASI Wise is part of ICEASI, so we use these standards to guide our programme and provide advice about knowledge and skills required for practice.Consultant OT, Director and CLASI Lecturer Kath Smith, pictured above, represents ASI Wise at ICEASI meetings.

 

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Coming soon the ICEASI website

Read more here:

More about ICEASI