Posted on Leave a comment

Dogs on Zoom

So today, Bear the Cockapoo will be helping out on Zoom. The little lad, let’s call him Ed, has ASD and doesn’t speak much. He does though talk to Bear. So Bear usually joins in at the clinic Ed. But not at the moment as C-19 means even dogs need to be socially distanced. Ed is missing Bear.

We are planning a double treasure hunt and obstacle course build today. Bear will do his obstacle course that’s designed by and built to Ed’s instructions. Ed will be building and doing an obstacle course developed by Bear and I. Read more below about why dogs are an incredible way to reach children with autism.

Bear recovers after a busy day online
Continue reading Dogs on Zoom
Posted on

Research Update: Sensory Over-Responsivity as an Added Dimension in ADHD

Anecdotally many Occupational Therapists who use Ayres’ Sensory Integration to inform assessment and practice report the close links between ADHD and sensory integration challenges. This article by expert Sensory Integration researchers Shelley Lane and Stacey Reynolds offers research evidence and neuroscience in strong support of the links between differences in processing and integrating sensory input for those who meet criteria for a diagnosis of ADHD.

Abstract “Years of research have added to our understanding of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). None-the-less there is still much that is poorly understood. There is a need for, and ongoing interest in, developing a deeper understanding of this disorder to optimally identify risk and better inform treatment. Here, we present a compilation of findings examining ADHD both behaviorally and using neurophysiologic markers. Drawing on early work of McIntosh and co-investigators, we examined response to sensory challenge in children with ADHD, measuring HPA activity and electrodermal response (EDR) secondary to sensory stressors. In addition, we have examined the relationship between these physiologic measures, and reports of behavioral sensory over-responsivity and anxiety. Findings suggest that sensory responsivity differentiates among children with ADHD and warrants consideration. We link these findings with research conducted both prior to and after our own work and emphasize that there a growing knowledge supporting a relationship between ADHD and sensory over-responsivity, but more research is needed. Given the call from the National Institute of Health to move toward a more dimensional diagnostic process for mental health concerns, and away from the more routine categorical diagnostic process, we suggest sensory over-responsivity as a dimension in the diagnostic process for children with ADHD”.

Read the full article here: Sensory Over-Responsivity as an Added Dimension in ADHD

Posted on

Neural Foundations of Ayres’ Sensory Integration.

Dr Susanne Smith Roley shared the draft of this with us when she teaching CLASI CASI M6 with ASI WISE in June. Lovely to see it in press and able to be shared! Thank you to all the authors! Just what’s needed to support practice.

Read it here: https://www.mdpi.com/2076-3425/9/7/153/htm

Posted on

AOTA Article: Trauma and OT

Many Occupational Therapists using a sensory integration approach in their clinical practice have worked productively and mindfully with children, adults and older adults with trauma. Our unique education and training facilitates our practice in a range of settings- schools, mental health settings and hospitals, where as a profession we are tasked to address barriers to participation in everyday life.

Occupational Therapists are uniquely placed to be able to offer not only cognitive behavioural and occupation based activities.

Neuroscience now provides us with the evidence to support our practice of Ayres’ Sensory Integration with our clients with trauma – confirming our understanding about how trauma impacts early and ongoing sensory and motor development, underlying physiology and levels of arousal and attention.

Now and into the future, we will need to further consider the evidence for how inter-generational trauma manifests in underlying neurobiological processes that underpin function – the sensory, motor and cognitive building blocks of participation in everyday life.

To read the full article please follow this link. https://www.aota.org/~/media/Corporate/Files/Publications/CE-Articles/CE-article-May-2019-Trauma.pdf

Posted on

Why learn the SIPT when the EASI is in development and about to be published, I don’t want to waste my money?

We regularly get asked this and similar questions. Here is our reply…

ASI WISE is absolutely committed to the EASI. Our Directors have been and are all involved in the development of the EASI and the global normative data collection of the EASI.

Please know that once you learn Ayres’ Clinical Observation and the SIPT on our current M3, you will be able to easily transfer learning to the EASI, including in future interpretation based on normative data currently being collected. You will also be introduced to the EASI where it is “in development” on our modules.

Our combination of online and face to face training is a modular programme run in conjunction with CLASI. It is very robust and will equip you with the research to practice not only in the UK and Ireland, but also abroad.

While your learning is considered post-graduate learning, including critique and analysis of research – this learning also includes hands on practical development of the knowledge and skills to be able to assess and treat a range of clients across the lifespan.

Learning ASI is a bit like learning to drive a car – some theory can be done online and from books, or in online chat sessions – but you do have to eventually get in a car and learn to drive with helpful supportive instruction, feedback and application in real life.

What do people say about our modules?

“That it is a great course where you’ll gain practical knowledge on sensory integration. It is fantastic to have three amazing OTs to provide you with examples and assist understanding your case studies.” Samantha Senior Paediatric Occupational Therapist

“Do it! Have an open mind be curious brave don’t be afraid to discuss challenge and critique; it will change your practice! ” Lindsey Lead OT in Intellectual Disabilities

“A very good course, hands on, very well documented and the best professionals in Ayres Sensory Integration teaching.” Alexandra PT