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Ayres’ Sensory Integration | Evidence-Based Intervention & Assessment

After a very late last night for those of us who were awake last night across the UK and Ireland listening to last nights International webinar, here is a message from us all.

Make space in your diary, grab a coffee and cake, or grab your juice and sunhat, but do make time to listen again! It was an awesome evening – and is well worth the time to listen – so glad it was recorded as many of us I am sure will want to listen again!

Mandy Adamson, one of our Directors has messaged the chat feed we are fortunate as International Instructors in ASI to be a part of with this message of thanks, which encapsulates so beautifully our experience of last night and waking after not so much sleep;

“I have just woken up with my head buzzing with more thoughts and questions and with immense gratitude to you all. I will be listening to the recording again and sharing with my colleagues…Onwards …”

Dr Sultan Alfawaz, has raised the bar and we are immensely grateful to him and his amazing team for being able to be a part of this incredible offer to hear from many of the people who do leading edge research and development about ASI across the globe.

“Congratulations to Sultan and his team at the  for a fantastic event!”

Judith Abelenda from Spain summarised the perfect timing of a message about the EASI’s development and Social Justice;

“Listening to the recording. Amazing presentations so far!!! Thank you so much Sultan for this event. So glad that you mentioned social justice, Zoe, I was just thinking, what an amazing night for this to take place. It will be for ever seared in our memories. . Little by little justice will be accomplished in every realm.”

From a UK and Ireland perspective, the presentations addressed and spoke to so many of the current concerns and debate on social media, and the queries and questions raised (and considered) by Local Authorities, judges in care tribunals, in CTR”s and CETR’s and by CQC.

As we had anticipated, last night has provided some excellent quotes and soundbites that address FAQs asked by those who don’t understand Ayres SI or and a lot of the recent critique about it not being linked to function.

However, it would be fair to say the event delivered far more. It showcased and once again provided a road map for others to follow; professionalism, etiquette and collegiate collaboration, hard work and with no apologies for their passion about the difference sensory integration can make to everyone’s everyday life.

The message was clear about the commitment of OT’s practicing Ayres’ SI to recognise sensory integration and processing strengths and challenges in those who are our clients, using researched and evidence-based tools that are accessible, affordable and fit for purpose  – delivering data to shape clinical reasoning and hypothesis generation so that therapists can creatively address sensory integration and processing challenges to support our clients’ personal goals related to their participation and engagement in everyday life.

The speakers explored a wide range of interventions that therapists practising ASI can use from “pure ASI” to universal design ideas based on the principles of Ayres SI including;

coaching and consultation,

parent education and support

traditional “pure” Ayres’ Sensory Integration that meets Fidelity

research about a playground project – taking the principles of Ayres SI to all children everywhere in a universal group approach using recycled materials.

 What a wonderful thing it is to have a recording of this awesome resource to be able to share this with our therapists and others in the wider health, education and social care community!

https://youtu.be/avp5KMUY798

 

1 thought on “Ayres’ Sensory Integration | Evidence-Based Intervention & Assessment

  1. Thank you! This was a fantastic evening of learning! Looking forward to going back and listening to the few at the beginning that I missed, due to a late-evening early intervention appointment. Shelly Lane was my Neuro professor at VCU in Richmond, VA, during her final year teaching there before she vanished to a land down under. It was wonderful to see and hear her, along with everyone else. Thank you again!

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