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Choosing Wisely ® and ASI – a fantastic initiative from AOTA – it got me thinking about why people think sensory is easy and just anyone can do it.

Just like a parent can decide a child has a cold and needs Calpol, a sensory rich home environment can help support development. However just like a child may need a Dr, Dentist or other specialist if they have a more serious illness, what some people need is specialist intervention. Sensory Integration therapy requires years of training, first just to become a therapist and then…

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EASI Update

Therapists across the globe are collaborating, giving of their time and energy to develop a new assessment tool to comprehensively assess sensory integration difficulties. This is the final call for therapists wishing to join the team for the UK and Ireland EASI ( Evaluation of Ayres’ Sensory Integration) normative data collection project. You can read more about this global initiative, Goal 2 of the ASI…

Sensory Integration is in the spotlight in neuroscience news…

..but publications and research by OT’s are needed to show ASI is effective! What more do we need to show how mainstream sensory integration theory is becoming than this recent publication in Neuroscience News. It is just a pity it says we need new therapies when we have a good one that has gold standard randomised control trials showings its effectiveness in the ASD population. Perhaps…

Research Update: Additional occupational therapy considerations for functional neurological disorders: a potential role for sensory processing.

Delighted to see this research article cited below as at the Merlin MS Centre in Cornwall Ayres’ Sensory Integration is a regularly used approach with adolescent and adult clients with functional neurological disorders. At the Merlin MS Centre, as well as assessment using Sensory Integration and Praxis Test (SIPT), Ayres’ Clinical Observations and the Adult/Adolescent Sensory History, we use the Model of Human Occupation Screening…

Supporting Practice – Your Questions Answered: Why did Ayres’ not consider the visual system?

So I was just asked “Why didn’t Ayres consider and put more importance of the visual system? I was a bit perplexed and so explored this further with the therapist asking the question. The OT explained that she has been taught that Ayres did not consider the visual and auditory systems and that this means that for School OT’s where many difficulties link to visual…

Occupational Therapy and Trauma 3: A Tool for considering the physical environment in children’s residential homes to address sensory processing issues in trauma-affected children

This article by Clinical Psychologists Christopher Robinson and Alicia Madeleine Brown in the Scottish Journal of Residential Child Care includes a lovely environmental checklist (adapted from Simpson 2009) used in considering the physical environment in three children’s residential homes. Abstract: Sensory processing issues are generally considered to be clinically significant in children who have suffered abuse and trauma and much has been written about the…

RESOURCES FOR PRACTICE: USING THE THEORY OF AYRES’ SENSORY INTEGRATION TO INFORM CLINICAL PRACTICE WITH OLDER ADULTS – 1.

We need to consider the importance of maintaining tactile discrimination skills – adequate tactile perception is necessary for using tools in a skillful way for participation in lifelong hobbies like sewing, model making, cake icing and painting. Last night we were delighted to receive a great fb update from our friend and colleague Tina Champagne. She has just received her advance copy of her book,…

Resources for parents and families about Occupational Therapy

It’s the Easter break, after all the fun, reality often sets in and parents start to think about back to school. The summer term with SAT’s and exams can often be a time of worry and anxiety for older primary and secondary school-aged young people.This week we will be featuring a range of resources, including from our colleagues across the pond… At ASI Wise we also…

Sensory Ladders

The first Sensory Ladders were made in 2001 for adults with sensory integration difficulties receiving help with mental health difficulties in Cornwall. Influenced by the paediatric Alert Program, they offered therapists a way to combine Dialectical Behaviour Therapy and Ayres’ Sensory Integration, addressing the development of the person’s self-awareness in collaboration with ward staff on an acute psychiatric inpatient unit. The need to start with the…

The “just right challenge” is not just about equipment and activity, it’s about our therapeutic use of self – as OT’s doing ASI we need to be shapeshifting chameleons.

The skillful therapist is like a chameleon – able to shapeshift and turn their hand to any and all presentations; artfully engaging with, weaving and drawing out magical cooperation; making it fun. The art of both assessment and therapy are to make sure whatever we do, it is the “just right challenge”. Whether it’s just the right way of being to connect to a child,…

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