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Top Tips for Sleep

In a Children’s Occupational Therapy practice, many parents tell OTs that they feel they could cope better if they just got more sleep. When I heard about Matthew Walker’s “Why We Sleep” book from a colleague on a course, I bought it and read it cover to cover. I then shared it with everyone in my life struggling with sleep because this book links sleep with mental health, physical health and sleep through the lifespan.

Here are “Why We Sleep” top tips for sleep hygiene from the appendix- is you want more information about why for any of these tips, go back to the book and dig deeper:

1)    Stick to a sleep schedule: go to bed and wake up at the same time each day as people have a hard time adjusting to changes.  Sleeping in on weekends can’t repay our sleep debt.

TOP TIP: set and alarm for bedtime

2)    Don’t exercise too late in the day: try to exercise 30 minutes on most days but no later than 2 or 3 hours before your bedtime

3)    Avoid caffeine: Coffee, cola, certain tea and chocolate contain stimulant caffeine and can take 8 hours to fully wear off.  Older teens may benefit from being cautioned that nicotine and alcohol also worsen sleep.

4)    Avoid large meals before bed: these can cause indigestion and having too many fluids might mean you need to get up to use the toilet

5)    If possible avoid medications that disrupt or affect sleep: over the counter and herbal remedies for cough, cold or allergies can disrupt sleep.  If you are worried, talk to a pharmacist or health care professional to see if any drugs you take might contribute to insomnia

6)    Don’t take naps past 3pm: Naps can help you catch up on lost sleep but if you nap too late in the day, it can be harder to fall asleep at night

7)    Relax before bed: don’t overschedule your day so you have no time to unwind.  Reading or listening to music could be part of your bedtime ritual

8)    Take a hot bath before bed:  Your body temperature will drop after getting out of the bath and this may help you feel sleepy and relaxed so you are more ready to sleep

9)    Have a dark, cool, gadget free bedroom:  Noises, bright light, an uncomfortable bed or warm temperatures can distract you from sleep.

10) Have the right sunlight exposure: Try to get outside in natural sunlight for 30 minutes a day.

11) Don’t lie in bed awake if you are still awake after 20 minutes or starting to feel anxious or worried get up and do some relaxing activity until you feel sleepy.  The anxiety of not being able to sleep can make it harder to fall asleep

 

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ASI and Supporting Parents of Children With Autism: The Role of Occupational Therapy

“…When creating an intervention plan, occupational therapy practitioners evaluate children with autism using observation and parent and teacher reports and also interview parents about their child’s relationships and eating, self-care, and daily living skills…”

Ayres Sensory Integration intervention is one of the most frequently requested and highly utilized interventions in autism. This intervention has specific requirements for therapist qualifications and the process of therapy. This systematic review of studies providing Ayres Sensory Integration therapy to children with autism indicates that it is an evidence‐based practice according to the criteria of the Council for Exceptional Children.” Schoen et al 2018 read more here

National Autistic Society in the UK explains Why is occupational therapy important for autistic children?

Occupational therapy using an Ayres’ Sensory Integrative approach – research supports the use of Ayres’ Sensory Integration, not just for Autism but also for other neurodevelopmental difficulties. See ASI 2020 Vision Goal 1 – Scholarship recent research and FB Group Evidence ASI

You can also read more about The Role of Occupational Therapy in Supporting Parents of Children With Autism on  AOTA’s website

 

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The Importance of the Sensory Environment for Premature Babies

Read more about one family’s journey through neonatal intensive care and what they have learned about the impact of the sensory environment on the developing nervous system of premature babies in this blog post By Anna Lee Beyer

 

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Health and Safety Fears Getting in the Way of Child Development

Ofsted has warned that some early years education providers have “undue concerns” about letting children play outside, climb and run around. These health and safety fears are hindering children’s ability to build up muscular strength and dexterity.

Without taking risks, children’s “natural inquisitiveness” is stifled, Ofsted’s annual report said, “In the early years, a crucial part of preparing children for school is developing their muscular strength and dexterity…

Read more in this article in the Telegraph

Ofsted is the Uk government’s Office for Standards in Education, Children’s Services and Skills. Ofsted inspects and regulates schools, services that care for children and young people, and services providing education and skills for learners of all ages. The full report is available here 

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The Shops are Full of Simple Christmas Crafts

The Christmas season is a fantastic opportunity to get our little ones involved in some Christmas craft activities at home. For those of us short on time or ideas the shops are full of templates and packs that you can put together at home… here are some lovely craft ideas that have been sent to us by some of our families this year, paper chains, both shop bought and homemade, and a beautiful Christmas llama.

Don’t forget there is still time for you to win a copy of Love Jean by entering our Christmas time book give away. Share your Christmas themed sensory ideas with our community… by leaving a comment on one of our Christmas themed blog posts or on our facebook page … before the 15th December 2018

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